Intel FSP reverse engineering: finding the real entry point!

Youness Alaoui

Youness Alaoui

Hardware enablement developer
Youness Alaoui

2018-05-10 UPDATE: Intel politely asked Purism to remove this document which Intel believes may conflict with a licensing term. Since this post was informational only and has no impact on the future goals of Purism, we have complied. If you would like the repository link of the Intel FSP provided from Intel, please visit their publicly available code on the subject.

2018-04-23 UPDATE: after receiving a courtesy request from Intel’s Director of Software Infrastructure, we have decided to remove this post’s technical contents while we investigate our options. You are still welcome to learn about reverse engineering in general with my introductory post on the matter, Introduction to Reverse Engineering: A Primer Guide.


Hi everyone, it’s time for another blog post from your favorite Purism Reverse Engineer (that’s me! ’cause I’m the only one…)!

After attending 34C3 in Leipzig at the end of December, in which we (Zlatan and me) met with some of you, and had a lot of fun, I took some time off to travel Europe and fall victim to the horrible Influenza virus that so many people caught this year. After a couple more weeks of bed rest, I continued my saga in trying to find the real entry point of the Intel FSP-S module.

Here’s the non-technical summary of the current situation: I made some good progress in reverse engineering both the FSP-S and FSP-M and I’m very happy with it so far. Unfortunately, all the code I’ve seen so far has been about setting up the FSP itself, so I haven’t actually been able to start reverse engineering the actual Silicon initialization code.